Experts

  • Position : Research fellow
  • Affiliation : PIR Center
complete list

Related articles

 

Since I delivered these remarks during a Track Two meeting between US and Russian experts, my essential point remains unchanged: Washington and Moscow need to discuss nuclear weapons and doctrine, even at the toughest bilateral moments. However, there remains a major obstacle to a similar discuss...

 

On July 16, 2018, one of the issues that might come up during the Russia-US summit in Helsinki is cyber security. This topic was discussed during the first meeting of Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump in Hamburg in July 2017. Although those negotiations yielded no practical result – the two preside...

New Issue of CyberPulse E-Journal for June 2016

07.06.2016

MOSCOW, JUNE 7, 2016. PIR PRESS  “Everything that occurs within the framework of the OSCE in matters of international information security, belongs to the sphere of confidence building measures, i.e. all of this, by definition, should be considered as military issues. However, for some reason this fact is often overlooked. And it is overlooked in vain. A factual acknowledgement by the OSCE member states of the existence of wars in cyberspace (and the use of information techniques) in modern international relations and a desire to carry out these wars as humanely as possible, ‘building confidence’, stems from that fact” — Alexander Fedorov, PIR Center Advisory Board Member.

On June 2nd, 2016, subscribers received the new issue of the CyberPulse e-journal, № 2 (20) for June 2016.

In March 2016, an additional set of the OSCE confidence-building measures (CBMs) to reduce the risk of conflict stemming from the use of information and communication technologies were published. Alexandra Kulikova, member of the PIR Center Working Group on international information security and global internet governance, describes the elaboration of this set of measures and expectations for the set in the article “The Second Set of OSCE Confidence-Building Measures in the Sphere of Cybersecurity: What is New?” (in Russian). She notes that in the process of developing a new package of norms there is an attempt to increase the circle of stakeholders and draw them to the discussion of these norms. “It is likely that in the next group of governmental experts in international information security, the matter of the norms of behavior in relation to the security of critical infrastructures will be particularly considered, as has been in the OSCE. The countries of the OSCE, in turn, will witness a promising discussion of measures for promoting stability in cyberspace, and will focus the third set of  OSCE confidence-building measures on this discussion”, Alexandra Kulikova concludes.

PIR Center Advisory Board Member Alexander Fedorov considers including the measures related to the critical infrastructure into the CBMs to be sensitive for national security, which is a source of difficulties in the discussion of these measures. “The most recent package of confidence-building measures in the sphere of information and communication technology, approved by the OSCE in February 2016, involves a problematic point: critical infrastructure. What does such an exchange of information on incidents on critical infrastructure objects mean? In my understanding, it is the provision of information on the means by which the attack was carried out, on measures that were implemented to protect the object, and on the consequences of the attack for the function of the object. However, how do the answers to the questions, which are most sensitive to national security, relate to the security interests of governments that own such infrastructures or have infrastructures located on their territories? Potential opponents, intelligence agencies, and militaries would be ready to pay well for such information,” he concludes. In the opinion of Alexander Fedorov, “Everything that occurs within the framework of the OSCE in matters of international information security, belongs to the sphere of confidence building measures, i.e. all of this, by definition, should be considered as military issues. However, for some reason this fact is often overlooked. And it is overlooked in vain. A factual acknowledgement by the OSCE member states of the existence of wars in cyberspace (and the use of information techniques) in modern international relations and a desire to carry these wars as humanely as possible, ‘building confidence’, stems from that fact”.

The new issue of CyberPulse contains a review of the measures (in Russian) taken by the state parties of the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit. The Summit was held in Washington, D.C. from March 31st – April 1st, 2016, and more than 20 of the Summit’s participants indicated a new generation of progress in this sphere in their national reports of work accomplished during the Summit.

In April 2015, PIR Center Consultant Oleg Demidov presented a review of critical infrastructure administration  in the European Union at the Russian Internet Governance Forum. Alexei Sokolov, director of network infrastructure development for the Yandex company, formulated an evaluation of critical internet infrastructure in the form of a multigraph (in Russian) for CyberPulse.

In May 2016, the International Committee of the Red Cross's Moscow delegation in partnership with PIR Center held the round table “Cyberspace Operations in Armed Conflicts and Proportionality Rule: Thinking out Loud”. Oleg Demidov believes that the discussion demonstrated the necessity of bringing together the worlds of theorists and practitioners and to involve specialists in information security of critically important objects in the dialogue of adapting international humanitarian law and cyberspace. He explains the importance of this cooperation in his blog entry (in Russian) at the PIR Center website.

The new issue of the e-journal is available on the PIR Center website.

To subscribe to CyberPulse, please register on the website and follow this link.


 

Comments

 
 
loading