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05.10.2022

«I have never had any role models. Journalism is a craft; it is the knowledge of the subject you are going to write about. You have to have some background. Journalism is also about the ability to reach people. When I was still an officer, I was fortunate enough to visit military enterprises with my father and there I got to know their general directors. When I went to the military academy, we were taught naval tactics, we studied ship weapons systems, but it was all about iron. It was immaterial. But when I started communicating with constructors, that iron suddenly came alive to me. Once I approached the officer on the ship, I straightaway began telling the combat commander what kind of missile was in service on the ship, what it was capable of, and what it consisted of. It opened a lot of doors because even the officers were not always aware of the whole range of problems and characteristics which are inherent to this or that technical item. On balance, we ended up with an interesting conversation, which revealed a host of interesting details», — Dmitry Litovkin, a military journalist, editor-in-chief of the Independent Military Review ("Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye").


04.10.2022

PIR Center continues a section "PIR Test". This project in the form of a game carries equally educational, research and analytical meaning. Users are given the opportunity to take the test - to answer one of the designated questions. Our today's PIR Test is about the Conference on the Establishment of a Middle East Zone Free of Nuclear Weapons and Other Weapons of Mass Destruction.

04.10.2022

65 years ago, on October 4, 1957, the first artificial satellite, Sputnik-1, was launched into Earth's orbit under the code name PS-1. This event has a great influence. The launch of the first satellite marked the beginning of space exploration.

04.10.2022

The authoritative publishing house Palgrave Macmillan (part of the Springer publishing group) releases the 2nd edition of the monograph Russian–American Nuclear Nonproliferation Dialogue: Lessons Learned and Road Ahead. The book was prepared by a team of 13 young and experienced researchers, edited by PIR Center Founder and Director Vladimir Orlov and PIR Center Research Fellow Sergey Semenov. It is also supplied with prefaces from William Potter, director of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS), and Anatoly Torkunov, Rector of MGIMO of the Russian Foreign Ministry.

"Security Index" Series History

The Security Index was the first Russian journal to focus on international security. It has been one of the leading journals in the complicated environment since 1994.

Initially the journal was known as Yaderny Kontrol and the export control was the main topic of its issues. By the mid-2000s – and with our contribution – that problem had been solved, and the time came for us to venture into new territories.

Back then, in 1994-1995, it sometimes felt as though “being born almost the same day your country was born” was a piece of really bad luck for the journal (and for its parent, PIR Center). At the beginning of new Russia, values and ethical criteria were eroded, and NGOs specializing in international security were seen as something unnatural. Now that we have reached a hundred, it is clear that the timing was not bad luck at all; it was actually our great good fortune. It was a time of great risks, but also a time when it was right and proper to take those risks and tread new paths instead of following in other people’s footsteps.

Vladimir Orlov,

PIR Center President, Editor-in-Chief of the Security Index journal

Our journal has always been one step ahead of international trends:

* We wrote about the logical link between missile defense and nuclear reductions 14 years before the issue began to make headlines in connection with the New START treaty;

* We predicted the establishment of a zone free of nuclear weapons in Central Asia 11 years before the Treaty of Semipalatinsk was signed;

* We ran several articles about the impact of the Internet on national security back at the time when less than 1% of Russian citizens had Internet access.

There is an increasing number of issues now being discussed in Russia which used to be off-limits, such as exports of sensitive materials and technologies, security, accounting and control of nuclear materials, etc... Other problems being discussed include the situation with the ratification of the START II and the Chemical Weapons Convention, or debates over the Russian nuclear weapons stationed in Ukraine. [...] There is a clear need for a truly professional publication targeted at both the expert community and the general public.

 Yuri Baturin,

the Advisor to the President of Russia on National Security, in his foreword to the first issue of the Yaderny Kontrol journal (November 1994)

We have published articles by presidents and foreign ministers, NATO secretaries-general and IAEA directors-general. The network of experts who have appeared on our pages spreads from Buenos Aires to Harare.

In addition to our core subjects of nuclear nonproliferation and disarmament, our authors have analyzed:

* the impact of biotechnologies on agriculture;

* the efforts by the Caspian nations to preserve the stocks of sturgeon;

* the outlook for the Cuban and Myanmar nuclear programs;

* the threat of climate change;

* the ethical conundrums of nuclear weapons.

 One important distinction of Yadernyy Kontrol, which remains to this day, is that the journal's editorial team is quite small. The job required versatile and creative people - and that is exactly the kind of people PIR Center is good at bringing up.

Vadim Kozyulin, PIR Center Senior Research Fellow, member of the Yadernyy Kontrol editorial team in 1994

The Security Index has its name since 2007. The readers in the Russian Foreign Ministry and the US Department of State, the Embassy of Sri Lanka in France and the PRC State Council, the Russian Defense Ministry and the Pentagon, the Russian Cabinet and the US Presidential Administration, as well as universities, colleges and research centers all around the world read the journal quarterly.

In response to our articles we receive letters from international organizations, ministries and governments of foreign countries. That is the kind of soft power which many countries are trying – often with little success - to acquire.

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